BLM: This Time There’s Real Hope

One of the most striking things about the images of Black Lives Matter protests is the number of white people in the crowds. In every city in the country and all over the world, white people are marching and protesting alongside Black people: they’re holding Black Lives Matter signs, wearing I Can’t Breathe t-shirts, covering their faces with Stop Killing Black People masks. And they’re out there with the same passion and urgency as the Black community.

I think it’s this unique quality, even more than the intensity and the continuing duration of the protests, that seems to give this moment a different feeling than recent BLM protests or previous cries for racial justice in America. I’m not the only one who’s noticed that this time feels different. And I think that this unfamiliar thing we’re feeling is hope.

Continue reading “BLM: This Time There’s Real Hope”

File Under “The More Things Change”: Demonstrations

Today I came across these words:

“You deplore the demonstrations that are presently taking place in [this city]. But I am sorry that your statement did not express a similar concern for the conditions that brought the demonstrations into being. I am sure that each of you would want to go beyond the superficial social analyst who looks merely at effects and does not grapple with underlying causes. I would not hesitate to say that it is unfortunate that so-called demonstrations are taking place in [this city] at this time, but I would say in more emphatic terms that it is even more unfortunate that the white power structure of this city left the Black community with no other alternative.”

They rocked me back in my chair.

Continue reading “File Under “The More Things Change”: Demonstrations”

Has the NFL Seen the Light?

The NFL has issued a statement saying it was wrong to censure players who protested police violence. “We, the NFL, admit we were wrong for not listening to NFL players earlier and encourage all to speak out and peacefully protest.”

The NFL: “We were wrong.”

Well, better late than never, I suppose. And I suppose the protests are having at least some small part of their desired effect if they are causing individuals and organizations to re-think their actions, their words, and their beliefs. It wasn’t a spontaneous awakening. The NFL’s statement came as a response to a video made by NFL players about racial inequity and asking the NFL to publicly make the statement that they were wrong, and that Black lives matter. But racial inequity is deeply ingrained in our national zeitgeist and it isn’t going to disappear overnight. So any steps in the direction of awareness and growth, even small ones, should be welcomed for what they are. For now, I’m going to set aside the sarcasm and the skepticism and just say: “Good on you, NFL.” For now.

Several years ago, when Colin Kaepernick began kneeling during the playing of the national anthem at the start of NFL games, he did so in protest against the mass incarceration of and the police brutality against African-Americans. Some other (mostly, but not exclusively, African-American) players began to kneel too. And America lost its collective mind. They called these peaceful protests “treason” and said that they “disrespected our flag and our troops.” Colin Kaepernick’s football career was over. Donald Trump called for protesters to be fired (for exercising their First Amendment rights). Vice President Mike Pence walked out of a game when players knelt. Conservatives called for a boycott of the games. And the NFL threatened to fine players who knelt and said that they could only do so in the locker rooms, but not on the field.

Continue reading “Has the NFL Seen the Light?”

File Under “Deflection”: Stupid Questions

I don’t condone the violence or the rioting. It’s wrong and it’s terrible and it’s gut-wrenching to watch my country descend into chaos.

I simply made an ill-advised attempt to re-direct certain people’s attention away from the rioting and back to the source of the protests. (Don’t ask me why I did it. I’d made myself a promise only yesterday that I would NOT engage on this issue. Oh, who was I kidding, of course I’m going to engage.)

I tried to remind someone that there is undeniable, systemic racism in our country and that’s what we should be focused on. “Let’s not let ourselves get sidetracked here,” I said. “The continued, systematic denial of human rights is the real problem. Let’s direct our outrage there.”

Continue reading “File Under “Deflection”: Stupid Questions”

Douse the Flames

Your concern is quite touching. Truly. Your words of concern for all those small business owners whose shops are being looted and businesses being burned to the ground in Minneapolis, Los Angeles, Chicago, and other cities all across the US during the riots sparked by the killing of George Floyd touch my heart. These people are just trying to make a living. They haven’t done anything wrong. These thugs must be brought to justice!

I know you’re not a racist. I know, because you said so. And I know that you’re moved by the plight of the oppressed and by the tragedy of Floyd’s death, (although he might have — no, probably did — deserve the treatment at the hands of the police officer — it’s impossible to tell from the video footage what came before — and after all if he could say “I can’t breathe,” then obviously he could breathe), but when the looting starts . . . well then that’s surely when things have gone too far. That’s real evil.

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Kavanaugh Situation Says a Lot About White Male Privilege

It’s no secret that white male privilege, specifically UPPER CLASS white male privilege, is so ingrained in our society that usually most of us don’t recognize it. That’s sort of the definition of privilege I guess. But other times it’s so apparent that it slaps us right across the face. That was the feeling I had today while I was listeningContinue reading “Kavanaugh Situation Says a Lot About White Male Privilege”

Hurricane Response vs. Sept. 11th

Last year in Puerto Rico 2,975 people died as a direct result of Hurricane Maria and Trump says they did a “great job.” On the other hand 2,977 people died in the 9/11 attacks (not counting the 19 terrorists) and for that we have spent 17 years at war at the cost of trillions of dollars and hundreds of thousands of lives. Chew on that.

Injustice

It’s time we stop thinking of Black Lives Matter as a “black person’s issue.” We need to stop thinking of #MeToo as a “women’s issue.” LGBTQ rights aren’t just important for gay people or people who have a gay family member. Islamophobia doesn’t just hurt Muslims; anti-Semitism doesn’t just effect Jewish people.

All people, of every race, ethnicity and religion, of every sexual orientation and gender identification MUST fight to ensure justice for everyone. We must all be allies in one another’s causes, because it’s going to take all of us standing together shoulder to shoulder doing the hard work necessary to create a society that is fair and just for every one of us.

NFL Players and the Flag: Two Years On

If there was ever any question that the wheels of justice turn slowly, the continuing controversy over NFL players, the national anthem, and racial injustice has provided the answer. It’s at once hard and not so hard to believe that we are still having this conversation almost two years after Colin Kaepernick first decided to take a knee during the national anthem before a 2016 pre-season game in response to the disproportionate numbers of black people being killed by police.

People of color are still being shot just for the crime of being black. And they’re being arrested for the crime of sitting in a Starbucks while black, and they are having the police called on them for the offenses of napping in their dormitory lounge while black, and moving into their apartment while black.

And still we continue to object to the very idea of players exercising their right to protest racial injustice.Continue reading “NFL Players and the Flag: Two Years On”

There Can Be No Compromise

“I have the feeling that we let our consciences realize too late the need of standing up against something that we knew was wrong. We have therefore had to avenge it—but we did nothing to prevent it. I hope that in the future, we are going to remember that there can be no compromise at any point with the things that we know are wrong. . . . .”

Eleanor Roosevelt’s words upon returning home after a visit to a displaced persons camp following the end of World War 2 serve today as a warning and a reminder. We must summon the courage do what we know is right.